E.g., 07/23/2014
E.g., 07/23/2014

Migration Information Source

Andra Mihali

The Dominican-born population in the United States has grown rapidly since 1960, and today, the United States is home to 960,000 immigrants from the Dominican Republic. This article provides up-to-date demographic information for Dominican immigrants in the United States, including statistics on distribution by state and metro area, educational and professional attainment, income levels, health care coverage, and more.

Marco Dormino/UN Photo

From a massive typhoon in the Philippines last November to the ongoing civil war in Syria, recent global events demonstrate that natural disasters and political strife occur suddenly and often without warning. This article examines the U.S. Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program that grants humanitarian relief to nationals of certain countries embroiled in violent conflict or recovering from natural disaster.

Bangui Airport
L. Wiseberg/UNHCR

The humanitarian crisis unfolding in the Central African Republic (CAR) has received scant world attention, even as more than 20 percent of the population of 4.25 million has been displaced as a result of deadly sectarian violence. This article examines the causes of the violence, the international community response, and the impacts of large-scale displacement within the country and beyond its borders.

Peter Haden

The phenomenon of unaccompanied children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border, typically after an arduous and often dangerous journey through Central America and Mexico, has reached a crisis proportion, with a 90 percent spike in arrivals from last year and predictions of future increases ahead.

Haitian immigrants
Mysterypill/Flickr

Between 1990 and 2012, the U.S. population of immigrants born in Haiti tripled in size, from 200,000 to 606,000. This article provides the most up-to-date demographic information available for Haitian immigrants in the United States, including statistics on distribution by state and metro area, educational and professional attainment, income levels, health care coverage, and more.

Marshallese watch a jepta dance competition
Michael R. Duke

Approximately one-third of the population of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, a series of islands and atolls in the Pacific, has relocated to the United States, with Hawaii, Guam, and Arkansas key destinations. Lack of economic and employment opportunities are among the leading factors that have prompted this migration. Access to education and health care, which are critically important for a population that has reduced life expectancy and significant negative health indicators, also represent key factors.

Recent Articles

Most of China's roughly 145 million rural-to-urban migrants were born after 1980, making this population the "new generation" of internal migrant workers. Having been directly influenced by China's rapid economic growth and recent sociodemographic policy changes, this cohort of rural-urban migrants offers much to learn with respect to their motivations. This article discusses survey data indicating that new-generation migrants have somewhat different motivations and expectations than their more traditional counterparts, such as the desire for excitement, fun, and career development independent of the needs of the family back home.

Muzaffar Chishti, Claire Bergeron, and Faye Hipsman report on the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to decide the constitutionality of Arizona's SB 1070, passage in the House of the Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act of 2011, DOJ lawsuits in Utah and South Carolina, and more.

More than 1 million people became legal permanent residents (LPRs) in the United States in 2010. Nearly two-thirds of new LPRs are immigrants with family ties in the United States, report MPI’s Carola Balbuena and Jeanne Batalova in this updated look at the latest statistics on legal immigration.

With the goal of building and sustaining economic growth in mind, some countries have intensified their efforts to court investments from their nationals and co-ethnics abroad, recognizing that diaspora entrepreneurs are uniquely positioned to spot opportunities in their countries of origin and capitalize on them.

Developing nations that were once primarily migrant-sending states are now experiencing a boom that is beginning to increase their attractiveness for highly educated and highly skilled migrants and beckoning their diaspora members home.

Pages

Peter Sutherland, Mark Krikorian, Frank Sharry, and Howard Duncan tell us what surprised them most this year.

The Effect of U.S. Elections on Immigration Reform

Transnational professionals, government officials working on cross-border issues, civil society activists, and specific segments of the immigrant population are all simultaneously national and global. Saskia Sassen of the University of Chicago explores these new "global classes."

In today's immigration debates, some insist the United States has always been a nation of immigrants while others believe illegal entry and threats to national security are unprecedented. Donna R. Gabaccia of the University of Minnesota shows how time shapes understanding of current immigration trends.

After years of debate, French Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy succeeded in passing a law that he argues will finally allow the government to control immigration. MPI's Kara Murphy looks at the law's main objectives.

Pages

This Spotlight by Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, examines some of the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the foreign-born population in the United States.

Globalization has made the international mobility of high-skilled workers a vital issue for the United States. MPI's Maia Jachimowicz and Policy Analyst Deborah W. Meyers explain the complicated visa system for high-skilled temporary workers.

Although the foreign born remain concentrated in certain states, many immigrants are moving into "non-traditional" areas. Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, has prepared a spotlight on their settlement patterns.

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 dramatically reformed the nation's welfare system. MPI's Amanda Levinson takes a closer look at how these changes affected immigrants.

Since the early 1990s, there have been more female than male immigrants to the United States. This Spotlight by Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, examines some of the characteristics of this important group of immigrants.

Pages

The search yielded 0 results

Pages

Machine-Readable Passport Requirement Delayed One Year...
California Allows Undocumented Immigrants to Obtain Driver's License...
US-VISIT Confronts Criticism, Potential Setbacks...
Annual Cap for H-1B Visa Holders Slashed...
New Citizenship Office Chief Appointed...
TPS Extended for Burundians and Sudanese, Terminated for Sierra Leonians...

Visa Waiver Transit Programs Suspended...
State Dept. Adds Visa Categories for Border Students...
Ridge Names Citizenship and Immigration Ombudsman...
State Dept. Requires Online Applications for Visa Lottery...
Temporary Protected Status Extended for Liberians...

State Dept. Tightens Rules on Visa Applicant Interviews...
Agreements With Chile, Singapore Open Door to Trade in Services...
DHS Fully Implements Foreign Student Tracking System...
TPS Extended for Montserratians, Salvadorans, Somalians...
DHS Expands Efforts to Deport ‘Predatory’ Criminal Aliens...

Justice Dept. Report Cites Abuse of Detainees After Sept. 11...
Court Approves Ongoing Secrecy on Post-Sept. 11 Detainees' Names...
Hispanics Become Largest Minority in the United States...
Post-Sept. 11 Economic Woes Squeeze H-1B Visa Program...

New Tracking System Will Photograph, Fingerprint Visa Holders...
Somali Bantu Refugees Resettled to the U.S....
Deadline Nears for LIFE Act Permanent Residency Applications...
Temporary Protected Status Extended for Hondurans, Nicaraguans...
ICE Slated for Reorganization...

Pages