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United States

United States

Historically a nation of immigrants, the United States is home to nearly 41 million immigrants, who represent 13 percent of the total population and play a key role in the economic, civic, and cultural life of the country. The research collected here covers many facets of immigration to the United States, by the numbers and how immigrants fare in the country's classrooms and workplaces, the policies and regulations that shape the admission of new immigrants, the enforcement programs and polices in place at U.S. borders and within the interior, and integration policies and efforts taking place in local communities, in states, and at the federal level.

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Reports
November 2004
By Suzette Brooks Masters, Kimberly A. Hamilton, and Jill H. Wilson

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Globalization has made the international mobility of high-skilled workers a vital issue for the United States. MPI's Maia Jachimowicz and Policy Analyst Deborah W. Meyers explain the complicated visa system for high-skilled temporary workers.

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Although the foreign born remain concentrated in certain states, many immigrants are moving into "non-traditional" areas. Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, has prepared a spotlight on their settlement patterns.

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Court Rules Secret Deportation Hearings Unconstitutional... Major Changes to Board of Immigration Appeals... New LPRs Break One Million Mark... U.S., Canada Agree to Final Draft of Safe Third Country Agreement... Refugee Admissions Fall Below Target... President Signs Child Status Protection Act...

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INS Commissioner to Resign... Requirement for Change of Address Notification... Social Security Changes Affecting Immigrants... H-1B Numbers Reflect Slowing Economy... Identifying Detainees Delayed...

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As the U.S.-born children of Latino immigrants reach adulthood, new data suggest that they will fare better than their immigrant peers. Richard Fry, Senior Research Associate at the Pew Hispanic Center, explains why.

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