E.g., 08/23/2014
E.g., 08/23/2014

International Governance

International Governance

Though there is no formal, multilateral institutional framework to govern the global flow of migrants, states increasingly are exploring how to work collectively to make migration a more legal, orderly, and mutually beneficial process. Cooperation on migration management has been growing steadily, as the research below explores, involving both state and nonstate actors via regional dialogues, bilateral agreements, and the creation of international initiatives such as the Global Forum on Migration and Development.

Recent Activity

Reports
January 2010
By Rocco Bellanova, Susan Ginsburg, Paul De Hert, and Hiroyuki Tanaka
Online Journal
Policy Briefs
October 2008
By Dovelyn Rannveig Agunias
Online Journal
Reports
October 2007
By Deborah W. Meyers, Rey Koslowski, and Susan Ginsburg

Pages

Recent Activity

Reports
October 2007

This report, the product of two workshops held on border management in Belgium and Texas, addresses three arenas of significant change shared by the United States and the European Union: 1) new government organizations for controlling borders; 2) the use of information technology to secure borders; and 3) visa‐free travel policies.

Reports
September 2007

This report examines the ways in which governments can make the emerging global mobility system work better for European migrant-receiving countries, their developing-country partners, and the migrants themselves.

Reports
January 2006

This report seeks to bring new light to the issues of migration by sea—particularly the interception and rescue of “boat people”—by synthesizing key discussion takeaways from an international forum of policymakers, international organizations, NGO representatives, and academics.

Books
October, 2005

This book analyzes approaches, strategies, and best practices from EU Member States that could contribute to a sustainable integration policy. It thus provides European, national, regional, and local decisionmakers with instruments they can draw on in establishing a framework for integration.

Policy Briefs
September 2005

This policy brief examines and reflects upon lessons learned from the last major attempt to resolve the problem of illegal immigration under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Arguing that stable reform will require three “E”’s— enforcing immigration laws effectively, expanding visas, and earning legal status —it also offers recommendations for immigration policymaking and management.

Reports
July 2005

This report looks at what, over time, has determined the various departmental or ministerial locations of migration policy decision-making in different states.

Reports
December 2003

Although the number of refugees displaced from the conflict in Iraq was significantly fewer than expected, the war produced some 260,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the North. Recent reports indicate that despite the threat of inter-ethnic retaliatory violence, many of these IDPs are now returning home.

Policy Briefs
June 2003

The events that unfolded in the U.S. on September 11 generated a renewed sense of urgency over border management. Bilateral Smart Border agreements were reached between the U.S. and Canada as well as the U.S. and Mexico in December 2001 and March 2002. This report tracks the implementation of these border accords and seeks to evaluate their effectiveness.

Pages